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's a shame that republicans are playing into mr. obama's hands negotiating in public among themselves prematurely giving up on the tax issue and undermining house speaker john boehner in the process. but in "the weekly standard" bill kristol hit back at "the journal" take on this saying it would be great if "the journal" editors had a better idea what republicans could do. they don't. if the house republicans follow the editors over the cliff, the only effect, i'm afraid, will be to turn a manageable reret in december into a panicked strategic route in january. "the new york times" points out that even if republicans agree to the president's key demand that the top tax rates return to the clinton era level, it would only be a quarter of the $1.6 trillion the white house is demanding leaving battles and limits on deductions and exemptions and estate and gift taxes all for another day. then there are other political minefields of entitlement cuts in spending. by the way, by choosing to make his fiscal cliff pitch in michigan, the president is stepping into the fierce battle over worker
to a tax revenue target well below the $1.6 trillion obama has demanded over the next decade. hello. open door anybody? that door on rates is clearly not entirely shut on the republican side nor on the president's side. "the post" lays out a scenario in which the house could adopt two competing bills, one extending the bush rates for everyone including the wealthy. the other extending the bush rates just for those making less than $250,000 a year. it gives republicans the opportunity to vote on both bills. both bills would then go to the senate. which would just pass the middle class tax cut bill or the house would end up passing what the senate already passed and that other bill just goes to die. so with it looking less and less likely washington will go over the cliff, that's gone. here are the real questions now. one, how big a deal will the parties make before the end of the year? two, have republicans stumbled into what could be political leverage at least in the short term? if all republicans do is extend the middle class tax cuts, punting the rest of this fight to february, when th
by republicans. and this is pretty much inevitable. the labor movement has already lost these fights everywhere else. still, president obama who was making a preplanned stop at a uaw representative factory in the detroit suburbs couldn't escape commenting on the fight so he weighed in yesterday denouncing the proposed new law. >> what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. so-called right to work laws, they don't have to do with economics, they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. >> schneider made this counterargument. >> michigan workers are hard-working people. and shouldn't they be able to make the choice they see value in the union and, again, hopefully make the unions more accountable and work harder to make sure they're showing workers the value proposition is why they should pay. >> and now you just heard the message as to why labor usually uses these battles over so-called right to work legislation. it is that word choice. republicans a
on whether president obama had the authority to make the recess appointments he did last year. justice correspondent pete williams. so, pete, what happened was basically the white house didn't view the senate as in recess though republicans were doing the same gig. >> reporter: the question here legally, is the senate in recess. the obama administration says, no. the sessions are a sham. they last less than a minute. the congress or the senate when it decided to do this passed an order saying that no business would be conducted during these pro forma sessions. what are more do you need? the senate says we'll decide whether we're in recess or not and we say we're not, and not only that in the early part of the recess from december of last year to january of this year, the senate actually passed an extension to the payroll tax cut. so is the senate in recess or not? and this is it either going to go to the supreme court, chuck, or the courts are going to say, you know what, we can't -- this is a dispute between the political branches. you guys work it out. i don't think it's 100% clear w
and then demint quickly became a leader and re hetorical flamethrower. >> if we're able to stop obama on this, it will be his waterloo. >> but demint had no significant legislative impact or victories regularly bucking the republican establishment, supporting senate candidates close to his own view of conservatism with, of course, mixed success. >> i've been criticized by some of my republican colleagues for saying i'd rather have 30 republicans in the senate who believe in the principles of freedom than 60 who don't believe in anything. >> he was an early supporter of florida senator marco rubio. now the gop star, incoming senator cruz who tells mike lee all on the demint list. while 15 won primaries just seven are united states senators today. many party leaders, in fact, blame demint for high-profile senate losses in indiana, delaware, colorado and nevada and in a statement made yesterday minority leader mitch mcconnell said this. i thank senator demint for his uncompromising service to south carolina and our country in the united states senate. service. he probably wishes he was a little
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)